Three weeks, four weddings and one dementia sufferer, with the help of the new Nikon Df

 

Nikon Df Review
Nikon DF Review with real life images by Mark Seymour Photography 

 

As a wedding photographer who primarily specialises in Jewish weddings, using a predominately reportage and journalistic style, I use the Nikon flagship camera the D4, with a selection of prime lenses.

But recently I was provided with the Nikon Df and it was great privilege to have the opportunity of trialling this beautiful retro styled camera from Nikon, in real life situations, where the pressure was on for me to deliver.

I initially played with the camera for a week adding some poignant black and white images to my personal project covering my fathers’ decline due to dementia. Once I felt confident with the controls and features I was excited to try out the Df for capturing my professional wedding images.  I must admit I did revert to my D4 at the point where the high tempo dancing takes place at both Jewish and Greek weddings had begun because I wanted to feel totally comfortable, as you have less time to think and I needed the higher focus speed of the D4. That’s not to say the Df is a slouch, with the focus system borrowed from the D610.

Overall Impression
It’s a beauty, with overtones harking back to the classic days of film and the great Nikon cameras like the F3 and the Fm3. Nikon have done to this camera what we have seen happen to the beloved design of the mini, in taking the look of a camera with nostalgic memories and installing it with their flagship digital camera’s sensor, to enable photographers to have the best picture making experience.

This is Nikon’s lightest full frame camera at just 710g with beautiful retro dials on the top plate and a 16Mp sensor inside, but also includes a small LCD that gives battery info, shutter speed, aperture selected and number of frames left along with a great LCD and shutter lag to a professional standard. The shutter is also the quietest, which is often a bug bear with the D4 during wedding ceremonies.

ISO is sometimes difficult to know on the dial without confirming what it is in the viewfinder, especially in low light.

Image Quality and Buffer
I’m blown away by the qualities of this sensor, the dynamic range is superb and you can shoot anywhere up to 204,ooo ISO with the buffer not to the standards of the D4 so if you are a photographer who shoots in high bursts, at times you will hit the buffer limit

Here is a selection of images taken with the Retro Nikon  Df in real life situations

Dementia
Nikon Df , 10,000 ISO, f1.8, 800 sec
Mum sitting in their Lounge straight from the 1950's
Nikon Df, 10000 ISO, F4, 80 Sec
The wedding of Lucy and Elvis
Nikon Df, ISO 6400, 200 sec , F4
Wedding ceremony of Lucy and Elvis
Nikon Df, ISO 6400, 200 sec , F4
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, ISO 8000, 40 sec , F5.6
Jewish bride at Home
Nikon Df, ISO 4000, 500sec , F2.8
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, ISO 4000, 100 sec , F4
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, ISO 4000, 125 sec , F4.5
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, ISO 2000, 400 sec , F1.4 85 mm lens
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, ISO 3200, 200 sec , F4. 85mm Lens
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, 3200 ISO, F3.2, 500 Sec
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, 2500 ISO, F5, 25 Sec
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, 4000 ISO, F3.5, 60 Sec
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, 5000 ISO, F4, 60 Sec
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, 5000 ISO, F4, 125 Sec
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, 1600 ISO, F2.8, 200 Sec  35mm 1.4
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, 1600 ISO, F1.8, 200 Sec. Nikon 50mm 1.4
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, 1600 ISO, F2.5, 320 Sec.. 50mm f1.4
Mark Seymour Photography
Nikon Df, 1000 ISO, F2, 100 Sec. Nikkon 85 mm 1.4

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